Digital Art Photography

I use reflection photography as a way of creating a more abstract view of London

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Reflection photography is the art of capturing images in mirrored surfaces; it forces you to look at a scene differently, and create a unique and emotive image. Like many outdoor photographers, I’d typically taken images that show reflections in lakes, but more recently I decided to use reflection photography as a way of creating a more abstract photograph, which caused me to view my surroundings in a whole new perspective.

Why did I start capturing the images of Canary Wharf?

I’d describe my photography style as somewhat eclectic, which leaves me plenty of room for experimentation. I started photographing the reflections at the docks of Canary Wharf at the start of November 2015. It was a foggy morning, and I initially went with the intention of capturing the tower blocks disappearing in the haze of low clouds. By the time I arrived the clouds had cleared, making way for bright winter sunshine which allowed me to notice the reflections in Canary Wharf for the first time.

Nick Joyner reflections

(Image credit: Nick Joyner)

Nick Joyner reflections

(Image credit: Nick Joyner)

This made way for more abstract photography, similar to that of Mike Curry who greatly inspires me, though I was not aware of his work until a little later. By looking at my surroundings through a different lens, I saw how the vivid colours of the buildings were reflected in the water of the docks, or how the reflections from different buildings interacted with each other to create complex patterns. At the time, I was so lost in the creativity and abstract that I felt like I had discovered something no one else had – though of course, this was not the case.

Nevertheless, one of these images was commended in the 2016 Landscape Photographer of the Year awards. By then I had returned a few times, adding considerably to the files on my hard drive. There seemed to be an infinite number of patterns to be seen in the bodies of water that kept pulling me back.

Nick Joyner reflections

(Image credit: Nick Joyner)

What camera settings and techniques do I use?

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